Welcome to my leadership journey

Beginning …

During my time at school, I absolutely loved supporting other young people, whether it be in sports, or with helping with their homework. I loved doing whatever was needed so that others could feel comfortable and relaxed in their life, and not panic or stress.

I believe I’m a natural leader. I began my involvement in leadership through fundraising. I met another amazing girl who had done a lot of fundraising in order to arrange several camps for the Deaf community.

I finally had a chance to become more involved in fundraising at the age of about 18 or 19. It was for the Crossing Borders Camp – a huge nationwide camp that had been organised and hosted by people from various states. There were lots of attendees/

I was able to participate in the camp twice. It was an amazing experience – I thoroughly enjoyed the wonderful experience being a part of something like that on a national level. I was a representative for New South Wales and as part of that group, I got the chance to meet others from Victoria and Queensland. I really loved it both times that I went.

The Crossing Borders Camp is held every two years. It’s not only for young people: it’s a place where experienced leaders can share their knowledge and teach the important skills that leaders need. They can share tips on how to improve and how work in a strong team.

Then in 2013, World Federation of the Deaf Youth Section ran a Junior Camp. I put in a submission was successful in winning the chance to accompany two young people to the camp. It was a profound learning experience for me! To be at an international event, with so many other people was incredible. I was able to learn to use International Sign, not just Auslan. It was such a thrill. The experience made me more enthusiastic to make a bigger contribution when I returned home.

At that time, there was no Deaf Youth Australia organisation. So a few people who is interested to make it happen and it got us together a group of interested people and we set it up. It’s been running continuously now for almost five years. I started on the board as a committee member, then secretary and for the past two years, I’ve been President. My term ended in December 2018.

I look back on my time as President of DYA with a lot of pride. We have achieved a great deal in providing support to young deaf people, in fundraising and organising many events. It’s been wonderful.

Then…

As well as my involvement in DYA, I joined the Board of the World Federation of the Deaf Youth Section in 2015 in Turkey. At the Youth General Assembly I nominated to join the Board and was appointed. I’ve found working at an international level to be a really eye opening experience. There are so many amazing people, involved with such a broad range of expertise. We work across different time zones to make a strong and cohesive team. We lobby for recognition of human rights, for education and access – all important issues for Deaf people. I’m very inspired by the things we do.

Leadership is my true passion because I want to see all young people develop strong alliances. That would be perfect!

Here is some snippets of my experiences within WFDYS 2015 – 2019 below. Enjoy!

Creator of quality designs and thinker of fresh ideas.

On the first part of my trip I went to Belfast in the UK.  It was quite an interesting and important experience because it was the first times that the WFD board and the new Youth Section Board, the WFDYS, had come together to have a meeting.

At first it was quite a challenge and a little bit awkward because I had not met these people before, I had to get used to how they work and what the Youth Section had done previously and plans for the future.  I was exhausted by the end of the week but it was really useful and informative.  They had shared a lot of information from an international perspective on issues I had never contemplated before, particularly because issues in Europe don’t often exist in Australia.  I hope to bring this learning back to help me encourage and support young people in Australia.  So I learnt a lot of information about human rights, technology, the importance of sign language and importantly how to support and encourage youth to get involved so that information can be shared across generations.

I also visited a few government agencies and their staff in different areas which was worthwhile.  Lastly, but really powerful, was a tour from a Deaf tour guide who told us about the rich and long history of Belfast and how the IRA fought for independence from England.  He told us stories from both sides including showing us the British flag and the Northern Ireland flags.  It was really quite fascinating and very enjoyable.  The weather was quite weird – it was raining heavily and there were floods but it was a great time.

Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli.

Try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value.

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli.

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli.

Now…

Before I finish my term for WFDYS as a Secretary, there were big three events to participate – WFDYS Youth Camp, YGA and WFD Congress.

Youth Camp

YGA – new elected

WFD Congress